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Challenges for Professional Interpreters in 2018

New technology is not the greatest threat interpreters face today. Most interpreters have accepted that new technologies are here to stay and they are adapting to them. The greatest challenge for interpreters continues to be the fight for professional recognition represented in fair pay, benefits and working conditions. Professional interpreters expect salaries comparable to similar professions.

Most interpreters have slowly adapted to remote interpretation. Video remote interpreting has been praised by end-users–mostly hospitals–and also by conference interpreters.

For those who have refused to join large remote interpreting corporations, new technology and the need for training is not their major concern. They complain that the largest corporations have done very little or nothing to upgrade their professional standards and working conditions. Many interpreters resent these corporations for using new technologies to lower the interpreters’ profile to call centers.

Conference Interpreting: My Experience and Services

International-Conference-@Crystal710

Last year, I interpreted for the Organization of American States-Inter-American Commission on Human Rightsweek-long strategic planning discussion sessions, hearings and broadcast conference. This was my first experience interpreting for a high-level, international meeting. I met OAS-IACHR’s Secretary, Commissioners and staff, some of whom had been ambassadors and saw first hand their impactul and inspiring work. I was teamed up with a colleague of mine. It was an intense, exciting, and very rewarding experience.

Initially, I was scheduled to work all five days, but because of the betting process interpreting agencies go through in order to reduce costs, a less-expensive interpreter was hired in my place. However, by the end of the first day, I was told that that interpreter was not able to continue and was asked if I was still available. I began on the second day. The “less-expensive” interpreter I was replacing asked me if she could stay to observe me. I told her that I didn’t mind. Thankfully, she left after an hour. She was a California court-certified interpreter, but was unable to work at a high level conference.

Conference or simultaneous interpreting requires a unique set of skills. CETRA’s blog explains, “Simultaneous interpreting is complex and demanding. It requires listening, understanding, sharp memory, accurate structure, inflection, and syntax, as well as a mastery of key terminology. Additionally, a command of two cultures is necessary to interpret idioms and address the audience in the correct register–formal and informal. Because simultaneous interpreting happens in real-time, there is no room for mistakes.”

Most conference interpreters have master’s degrees in interpreting. Others have master’s degrees in a related area plus professional training from a certificate program. The foundation of my training has come from interpreting at community meetings and my degree in intercultural relations. For me, interpreting is a natural way to operate requiring the ability to perceive a message from two different perspectives without changing its meaning. My favorite settings are international conferences, executive and official meetings and business presentations, training sessions, and community events.

For more information about my interpreting services and scheduling, please go to my calendly.  

Recommendations for Intercultural Interactions

By Mari D. González

I conducted a series of training sessions last year for a company whose employees are close to 50 percent Latinos of which about 30 percent are not fully bilingual. The communication across cultures is as challenging for English-dominants as it is for Spanish-dominants.

Several Asian-American employees also work for this company. Their communication style is different from Americans as well as from Latinos which enriched our training activities and discussions.

At the end of the mixed-group training sessions, I asked participants to brainstorm on what they had learned and what has worked for them in the past that they can apply when communicating with someone outside their primary culture and language.

My question was, based on what you have learned during training and from your own personal experience, what do you recommend when working with people from different cultures?

I wanted the “takeaways” to come from them instead of me. This is what they came up with:

  1. Have a positive attitude.
  2. Do not be afraid to ask questions.
  3. Use “yes or no” questions.
  4. When unclear, ask again, paraphrase and repeat.
  5. When something is critical, communicate face-to-face.
  6. Use non-verbal communication such as hand gestures.
  7. Ask for help when needed; simply say “I need help.”
  8. Talk slowly, not necessarily louder.
  9. Avoid the use of slang.
  10. Show it instead of telling it.
  11. Use pictures and visual aids if possible.
  12. Give a warning upfront if your second language skills are limited.

La RAE and US Spanish

By Mari D. González

I completed a translation project over the weekend and felt satisfied to deliver my work before the deadline. My client who does not speak Spanish​ fluently​ celled immediately to ask me ​to edit my work because ​she had found a mistake.

She discovered that in previous translations I have used “1ro” to abbreviate “first,” but this time I used “1.o” instead.

Why the change?

I wanted to follow the Royal Spanish Academy‘s (Real Academia Española-RAE) standard. In doing so, I confused my client and it is very likely that I’d have confused the intended audience who are more familiar with “1ro” too.

While in Mexico the agreed abbreviation for “primero [first]’ is “1o” without the dot or the “r” in between, in the U.S., the most common abbreviation is “1ro” which emulates “1st.” Both deviate from La RAE’s standards to accommodate to national preferences.

Because in intercultural communication as in translation meaning matters more than literal interpretation, I corrected my translation to follow not La RAE’s recommendations, but my client’s suggestion.

Low and High: Context in Communication

Vitalworks-Hospital-CCO Public Domain

By Mari D. González

Published at DTC Perspectives on September 16, 2014

As a professional medical interpreter and a cross-cultural communication consultant, I find cultural contexts the most challenging and fascinating aspect of translating between Spanish-dominant patients and English-dominant doctors during medical interpreting assignments.

Cross-cultural communication refers to the comparing and contrasting of different communication styles based on culture. One of the basic tenets in cross-cultural communication is the influence of our personal and social identities on the way we communicate.

If we are dominant in one language—in the case of monolingual speakers—or more dominant in one language than another—in the case of Spanish-dominant or English-dominant speakers—a particular cultural programming or set of values, world view, or behavior always dominates when we converse. Harry C. Triandis observes in his article, “The Self and Social Behavior in Differing Cultural Contexts” that “People who speak different languages or live in nonadjacent locations…have different subjective cultures” (1989, p. 506). Our dominant or primary language provides an essential clue into our social upbringing and communication styles.

Spanish-dominant Latinos/Hispanics are predominantly “collectivist” and “high context” due to their group-based identity and their ability to get implied meanings in oral communication. Triandis further states, “Individualists give priority to personal goals over the goals of collectives; collectivists either make no distinctions between personal and collective goals, or if they do make such distinctions, they subordinate their personal goals to the collective goals” (p. 509).

Generally, Spanish-dominant patients lack the necessary knowledge of U.S. culture to completely understand the narrowness, linear-ness, and precision of “individualist” or “low context” communication. On the other hand, a medical provider or physician whose primary language is English may often get frustrated by the expansiveness, circular-ness and all-over-the-place “high-context” communication style of Spanish-dominant patients.

The medical interpreter, in her role as cultural broker, performs a delicate balancing act: She has to explain to doctors that the patient is giving the context for his or her answer while explaining to the patient that the doctor is looking for a precise, specific, and short answer. Impatience is the doctor’s natural reaction to a perceived overload of information. This need for exactness is crucial in the financial, accounting, and technology fields, but it is not always recommended at the doctor’s office because impatience does not help in building trust. It results in patients not asking the right questions or reporting inaccurate information due to a fear that the doctor may get upset.

People from collectivist cultures, such as Spanish-dominants, value harmony over confrontation. Harmony is an essential value if you come from a large and extended family. Maintaining harmony and balance is a requirement to keep large groups functioning. Furthermore, people from high-context societies sharply scan emotions and grasp what was not explicitly said. It does not matter if a doctor smiles at the patient while being impatient. The emotion and what he or she implied was perceived first.

To mediate this exchange of low context and high context communications, medical interpreters find themselves repeating the doctor’s linear and precise questions to patients who typically give the whole context by using stories and not answering with a yes or no or with a specific number. Most patients eventually understand that their doctors are looking for clear-cut information, but they do not always understand why the rest of the information is not as important.

Let’s not confuse a basic-to-intermediate-level of fluency in a foreign language with understanding the culture of those who speak it as their primary language. Applicants for jobs as health care providers may include fluency in Spanish, or any other second language for that matter, among their qualifications, but that may indicate nothing about their “cultural fluency.” Cultural fluency is gained through socialization or a constant association with those who speak a different language, which promotes a sense of shared comfortableness. If language fluency was acquired indirectly through media such as CDs, DVDs, books, or even through courses that are devoid of people from that culture, the cultural fluency that allows one to perceive differences in communications styles will be lacking.

Classical Nahuatl

By Mari D. González

Here are two interesting quotes on Nahuatl, the language spoken in what is today Central Mexico and parts of Central America which has given Spanish many words.

“At the conquest, with the introduction of the Latin alphabet, Nahuatl also became a literary language, and many chronicles, grammars, works of poetry, administrative documents and codices were written in it during the 16th and 17th centuries.” Cagner, 1980:13

 

Nahuatl

 

“This early literary language based on the Tenochtitlan variety has been labeled Classical Nahuatl and is among the most studied and best-documented languages of the Americas.” Cagner, 2002:195

 

When Translations Drift Away from Meaning

Drift Away

Drift Away (Photo credit: Charisma Jonesford)

The article “9 Little Translation Mistakes that Caused Big Problems”  by Arika Okrent has clear examples of wrong translations and the implications for intercultural communication, international relations, and marketing.

Interestingly enough, most examples in the article involved translators who translated into their second or third language and not into their native language. Food for thought.

Social Media Is Changing Translation

Texting on a keyboard phone

Image via Wikipedia

By Mari D. González

Keynote speaker Jaap van der Meer, TAUS  Director, addressed “Translation in the 21st Century” at the 2011 FIT World Congress in San Francisco.

Jaap spoke about the changes to and implications of the translation process as new translation technologies and online communication become more prevalent and accessible. He emphasized that translation is one of the basic needs of human civilization, thus we need the help of computers.

Topics and questions Jaap discussed include:

  • Translation companies, like other businesses, are in need of a new strategy.
  • How do incoming text messages get translated?
  • Does “one translation fits all” still apply?
  • The consumer is involved by asking and getting responses from each other.
  • Translations are being supplemented with volunteers or done via “crowdsourcing,” in which a project is “outsourced to the crowd.” People respond to an open invitation to collaborate and work as one community. Facebook crowd sourced the translation of its page to different languages.

Jaap concluded that the “top-down globalization, export mentalityis phasing out.” Translating is no longer a requirement fulfilled by an individual or a specialized team. The new translation process is CIRCULAR, on going, customized, and user driven.

As a result, companies have to take notice of the end user who is generating content, contributing, translating, and adding new vocabulary.

Translation Standards – FIT 2011 World Congress

Map of members of ISO

Image via Wikipedia

By Mari D. González

I attended the International Federation of Translators – FIT 19th World Congress in San Francisco representing the International Medical Interpreters Association – IMIA and participated in two of the sessions on August 3 and the Key Note Session on August 4. Here are my notes from the two sessions.

I. “Quality Standards and the Translator’s Role” presented by Kristen Corridan, LUZ, Inc., Procurement and Quality Manager.

  • Quality is in the eye of the beholder or defined by what the client wants.
  • Standards are the requirements that ensure quality but do not delineate the “how” or “what” in a translation project.
  • Standards define and measure the process, customer satisfaction, and the requirements.
  • Basic translation job requirements are:
  1. Must done by a native speaker
  2. Who is a subject matter expert
  3. Has a number years of experience
  • The translation process should include:
  1. Client-approved glossary agreed by translator
  2. Editing
  3. Proofing
  • ISO(International Organization for Standardization) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards
  • GALA(Globalization & Localization Association) has developed new standards.
  • Localization Standards are:

– EN15038 Europe

– ASTMF2575-06 International

– SAE-J2450 Automotive criteria (acknowledged because it taps into terminology and grammar)

In sum, the standards ensure a “process” that is uniform but not necessarily measure the “quality” of the content.

II. Translation Quality Standards presented by Jiri Stejskal, U.S; Beatriz A. Bonnet, U.S., Zhang Ciyun, China; and Reiner Heard, Germany.

EUROPE

  • In Europe, translations are done by a team of professionals that include a:
  1. Translator
  2. Reviser
  3. Reviewer
  4. Proofreader
  5. Final Verificator
  • Standards are overseen by the European Commission and focus on:

– Certifications

– Quality

UNITED STATES

  • In the U.S., standards are more detailed and include:

– Terminology and tools

– Specifications based on job standards and client’s requests such as:

-Marketing

-Nonprofit

-Pro bono

  • The editing and proofreading can be done by the translator.
  • Standards are about meeting the expected requirements of the outcome.

CHINA

  • Mr. Ciyun described the current challenges China faces since the demand for translations has grown beyond the capacity to establish a nation-wide uniform translation process.
  • The biggest challenged is the conflict between the market share and ensuring quality with the goal on customer satisfaction while working on the urgent need for standardization.
  • An important fact he shared was the earnings disparity between a translator and an interpreter. An interpreter can make $1,000 per day compared to $30 per day earned by a translator.
  • He spoke of

– A fast growing industry

– Chaotic market orders

– Translations that began as in-house work for which there is no regulation

– 1 million people is involved with doing translations

– Translators are faced with new Chinglish (English and Chinese) terms.